Visiting Scholar

The Scholars-in-Residence Program at the Andrews Forest began in 2007 to provide opportunity for scholarly work beyond the scope of the traditional programs of ecological and environmental science research or writers-in-residence program that are part of the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program.  Scholars bring a specific project of their own that will benefit the Andrews Forest program and their time there.  Some Scholars come via the Andrews Forest Writers-in-Residence Program application process, but we direct them the Scholars-in-Residence program when we see that they are not focused on the objectives and approach of the Reflections program intending to prompt new works inspired by the forest. The Scholars-in-Residence program is open to all disciplines. Past scholars include environmental historians, nonfiction writers, botanists, ecologists, and environmental designers.  Residencies are generally provided lodging for a one to two week period.  No stipend is available at this time. There is no formal application form or deadline for receiving inquiries.  If you are interested in applying to be a scholar in residence, contact Fred Swanson.

Todd Gilens

San Francisco environmental artist Todd Gilens visited the forest for a week in early November 2011 where he worked on an essay concerning his environmental public art work displaying images of endangered species and their habitats on buses in San Francisco.

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Kurt Fausch

Professor in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology, Colorado State University, visited in Fall 2011 to work on his award-winning book For the love of rivers: a scientist’s journey (2015, Oregon State University Press).

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Leslie Ryan

Landscape architect Leslie A. Ryan visited the Andrews Forest as a Scholar-in-Residence November 5-9, 2012, and returned on a longer-term basis as a PhD student in the Forest Ecosystems and Society program at Oregon State University where she works with Andrews Forest LTER Principal Investigator Michael Nelson to research interactions among artists, humanists, and scientists.

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Elizabeth Farnsworth

visited Andrews Forest as a Scholar in Residence Oct. 20-25, 2010, to exercise her wonderful artistic and literary in combination. Elizabeth trained as a scientist, taught at Smith College, was a Bullard Fellow at Harvard Forest, and has served as Senior Research Ecologist with the New England Wild Flower Society.

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Elizabeth Farnsworth

Elizabeth Farnsworth visited Andrews Forest as a Scholar in Residence Oct. 20-25, 2010, and we include her here in Arts in the Andrews because of her artistic contribution to the Forest’s work. Elizabeth trained as a scientist, taught at Smith College, was a Bullard Fellow at Harvard Forest, and is Senior Research Ecologist with the New England Wild Flower Society.

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Rachel Clark

who identifies as Idaho writer, mother, biologist, visited the Andrews Forest in April 2009 to formulate ideas for a non-fiction book she’d been plotting. As so often happens, the experience nurtured and inspired so much more than she’d planned. Since the 2009 Andrew’s visit, Rachel–a veteran science writer–has written her first nature/science-based novel, titled “The Blackfish Prophecy” (Booktrope 2016), Book 1 in a planned series: “Terra Incognita and the Great Transition.” Rachel’s time at Andrews directly fed the setting and scenes for her novel, which takes place in the Pacific Northwest and its magnificent Douglas-fir and cedar forests. The science and research community at Andrews likewise helped inspire the story line.

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Gordon Sayre

(Professor, English, University of Oregon) visited the forest September 1-5, 2008, to work on an essay entitled “The Oxymoron of American Pastoralism” which examines how the concept of “American Pastoralism” has been defined by major scholars of American history and literature, in light of the fact that no Native peoples in North America relied on a pastoralist, or herding subsistence. The work draws upon the writings of natural historians, anthropologists, and literary figures from Thoreau and Adam Smith to Jared Diamond.

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Gregory A. Smith

(Professor, Graduate School of Education and Counseling, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR) specializes in place- and community-based education. During his April 17-20, 2007, residency at Andrews Forest he worked on a chapter for his co-authored book on this topic (Smith, G., and D. Sobel. 2010. Place- and Community-based Education in Schools. New York and London: Routledge; Smith, G., and D. Grunewald (eds.). 2008. Place-based Education in the Global Age: Local Diversity. London and New York: Taylor & Francis).

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Linda Hardison

(Director, Oregon Flora Project, Oregon State University) visited the Andrews Forest in 2007 and wrote about the Oregon Flora Project, which she leads.

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